@UofSHealthPsych at Healthier U Day (University of Scranton)

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healthieruf161On Friday, September 16th, the Clinical Health Psychology Lab took part in the University of Scranton’s Healthier U Day event from 1:00-4:00 pm. Seven lab members introduced fellow students to the concept of health psychology, demonstrated its usefulness for behavior change, and provided information about ways to stay healthy on campus.

At 1:00, the line to enter Healthier U Day stretched the entire length of the Dionne Green. (If you’ve never been to our campus, this is about the size of a soccer field.) We were pleased to see so many students interested in learning more about health and wellness on campus. Our table was greeted with groups of 5 to 10 students at a time, who were eager to learn. To keep up with the flow of people, students were directed to start with our survey question and work their way through the rest of our table from there.

Our discussion began with the question, “What is your most common barrier to exercise?” We offered four options, and over 50 students responded: 64% said “I’m busy/have no time,” 18% said “I have no one to go with, ”18% said “The gym is too crowded/ I fear being judged,” and less than 1% said “I don’t know where to go.” These results demonstrate that time management seems to be the largest barrier to physical activity for college students. However, we observed the majority of students who reported fear of judgement or did not have anyone to go with were female, with the exception of males who were freshman. Such observations could lead us to new research questions about social support for exercise in these subgroups.

Based on the responses, students were directed to a visual web of solution stems, printed on a poster (pictured below). Solutions were recommended by lab members as methods that work for us in everyday life, so students got some insight into how we overcome the psychological barriers presented on the poster.

psychological-barriers-to-pa-healthier-u-day-2016We also introduced students to the types of studies and research questions that are conducted by our lab. We tried to make sure that the female students knew about Project CHASE, as we are recruiting for that study. We continued by giving students an overview of the field of health psychology. Students were given handouts, including exercise resources on and off campus and tips for healthy eating behaviors.

Our exercise resource sheet included information about off-campus resources and on-campus options other than the university’s gym. It included: The Jewish Community Center’s Group Exercise Classes, Yoga for Grief Relief, and Nay Aug Park, as well as  The Byron Center’s Open Swim and Intramural Teams. Students were surprised to see some of the options they had for physical activity in the area, and many seemed excited to take home a copy of the sheet. Some examples included in the healthy eating sheet included advice like “don’t eat and work” and “don’t completely take your favorite foods out of your diet”. These handouts were meant to increase convenience and thereby increase the likelihood of positive health behaviors.

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From Left: Team Members Zuhri Outland, Marissa DeStefano, Kerri Mazur, & Sabrina DiBisceglie

After guiding students through the survey and suggestions for positive health behaviors, several people were interested in taking the Health Psychology course offered in the spring semester (PSYC 228). Many students were unfamiliar with the concept of health psychology beforehand, and were curious to learn more after visiting our table. Overall, we were pleased with the feedback we received at the event, and we hope our presentation will allow students to make healthier choices!

Contributors to this post: Marissa DeStefano, Zuhri Outland, Kristen Pasko, Sabrina DiBisceglie, Kerri Mazur, and Dr. Arigo.

 

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