MEET @ROWANCHASELAB: Interview with Kristen Pasko

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Kristen Pasko is a second-year student in Rowan’s clinical psychology Ph.D. program, and she’s been with CHASE Lab since 2014. She was interviewed by first-year Ph.D. student and lab member Laura Travers.

@RowanCHASELab: Let’s start off with a broad question. When did you first know you wanted to focus on the field of psychology?

KP: I think my first recollection of wanting to be in this field came at the end of high school. At that point, I had seen the impact that mental illness could have on others around me – how it could truly prevent individuals from doing what they wanted in life. I decided that at the very least, I wanted to be a mental health advocate.

@RowanCHASELab: What made you choose to work with the CHASE lab and to have Dr. Arigo as your mentor?

KP: I actually have quite a bit of history with CHASE. Dr. Arigo has been my mentor since my sophomore year at The University of Scranton. I began working with her as a research assistant, then as her research coordinator after graduation. At that point, I fell in love with health psychology from everything I learned from her in that lab. When it came time to apply for graduate school, she brought my attention to Rowan University’s Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology for its emphasis in health psychology and integrated healthcare. Little did I know that she would get a job offer at Rowan around the same time. I was fortunate enough to interview with Dr. Arigo and had the realization that many of my research interests were borne out of my very training with her, and that she was the best fit for a grad mentor.

@RowanCHASELab: Could you tell us about your research experience so far? What you think has helped you be a good researcher?

KP: One of my favorite things about research is that it feeds my never-ending curiosity. I’ve always thought about the process like completing a puzzle. There are so many pieces missing and it takes a great amount of focus, dedication, and curiosity to collect pieces to understand the bigger picture. Once one piece is found, then you have a clue about the next piece. Once one research question is answered, you’re left with the next question.

Focusing on enjoying this process has been important. Much of the time, research can feel drawn out, and setting little goals for yourself can provide that small reward. One of the biggest takeaways for my personal success has been to force myself to engage in constant critical thinking. As a researcher, there has to be a reason why you’re studying that specific topic, with that specific method to answer that specific research question.

@RowanCHASELab: What are your research interests? How have they changed from your undergraduate career to now?

KP: That’s actually a bit of a loaded question! Much of my initial work focused on health behavior and social influence broadly. Towards the end of my undergraduate career and time as a research coordinator, I realized that my true interest lies in health behavior within the context of chronic illness and how social influences through family, friends, and other individuals with illness directly and indirectly help and hinder healthy behavior.

@RowanCHASELab: What professional goals do you have for yourself this year?

KP: For the remainder of my second year in the Ph.D. program, I hope to push myself to even higher levels of quality and efficiency in my work. I also want to remember to enjoy myself.

@RowanCHASELab: How has what you’ve learned so far affected your plans for after graduate school?

KP: I have many answers for this. However, one of the biggest things is giving myself time to meet my long-term goals. I have so many research ideas that I am itching to pursue now, but a career in clinical psychology means lifelong learning. Trying to do everything at once usually means that you don’t do anything well. So I want to pace myself and see how each step informs the next.

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